Make America Pleasant Again

pleasantville

So yeah, if you know anything at all about me, then you know I’m a pretty gigantic Star Wars fan. Yeah, I’m one of those passionate, passionate fans(geeks, nerds, etc.) that reads a bunch of books, comics and games Star Wars related. It’s a lot of fun and entertaining on the surface, but there are deeper themes and meanings that I pay attention and insist others do as well. Themes of religion, history, human nature, and society that make what’s essentially a couple of “popcorn movies” stick in the cultural zeigeist of America.

Well, another one of my favorite movies(without Star Wars in the title) does the same thing. Pleasantville is a movie that came out in the late 1990s, starring Tobey Maguire, Reece Witherspoon, Jeff Daniels and a couple of other faces you might have noticed from the 1990s and 2000s. The movie itself entertains one of those childhood wish fulfillment fantasies where we’ve all dreamed of being in our favorite TV show or movie interacting with the characters we see and go the places they go.

Well, in this story, it had Tobey Maguire and Reece Witherspoon playing teenaged siblings, growing up in present-day America, however the two had two divergent personalities, which reflected in their television interest. Witherspoon’s Jennifer was the popular girl, very… umm.. “social” and was very much a product of the “MTV Generation” that she watched when she would watch TV and not out at a party. Maguire’s David was the total opposite. He was shy, reserved, extremely unpopular and was much more comfortable at home on a Friday night than at a party. And he would spend those Friday nights watching reruns of his favorite show, a 1950s era sitcom called “Pleasantville”. This show, is a fictional version of other shows at the time like the “Dick Van Dyke Show”, “Leave It To Beaver” or “The Donna Reed Show”. Those picturesque families of the time in single family homes with white picket fences, well-manicured grass in a suburbia heaven, also called Pleasantville. The show, like others like it, was in black and white and starred a middle-class family, mother, father and two teen-aged kids, a boy and a girl.

As the movie progressed through the first act, you see David is preparing for a Friday night at home with a “Pleasantville” marathon. Meanwhile Jennifer had a hot date with the popular jock and they planned to watch the MTV Music Awards. So as the two siblings get ready for their night, not aware of each others plans they converage over the TV remote and a fight ensues, which results in the remote being busted against the wall. All of sudden Don Knots, a hallmark from that era of television, shows up and after being impressed with David’s knowledge of TV trivia gives him a “special” remote, which after more arguing, causes both David and Jennifer to be zapped from their real present-day lives of the movie to the idyllic life of the two kids in the show Pleasantville. They were literally trapped in their television, completely in black and white, with all the trappings of life, not just in that age but with the warped reality of television that defined life at that time. And the reality rules of “Pleasantville” were quite different than the normal reality we know or that David and Jennifer knew. Everything in Pleasantville wasn’t just in black and white, but everything was the idealized “Pleasant”. The weather was always “pleasant”. The food was always “pleasant”. Neighbors were “pleasant”. Everything everyone said and did was what was defined as “pleasant”. Husbands came home after work ready to eat dinner made by content housewives. The end of one road out of Pleasantville inevitably lead back beginning of that same road. The high school basketball team always won(because they never missed shots). Books and bathrooms were for show and did not enlighten or give comfort. The only purpose of the fire department was to rescue cats stuck in trees.

However as the movie progressed, you see the veneer of “pleasant” being pierced with the more David and Jennifer forced or accidently made the people of Pleasantville feel anything that was not deemed “pleasant”. The first time this happened was when the basketball team captain, Skip(played by a pre-Fast and Furious Paul Walker) was supposed to ask out Jennifer, or who he thought Jennifer was from the “Pleasantville” show. David, who knew each episode, knew that they were in the episode where he ask her out and they have a date. But David also knew that as happy as he was living his perfect fantasy world, Jennifer was struggling having to live by the 1950s era rules and morals. So he suggested to Skip that perhaps he can ask her out another time when she’s more accustom to how things were, which caused him to feel despondent and out of frustration, Skip threw the basketball to the hoop and it rolled out surprising everyone in the gym that made every shot they attempted. Of course, the changes did not stop there. The more noticeable change outside of changes feelings and actions were the changes in color that came with it. Later in the movie, Skip did get his date and instead of showing his interest by giving Jennifer his school pin, Jennifer took the opportunity to show her interest and have sex with him in the backseat of his car, which is something that wasn’t done in the 1950s era “Pleasantville”. And as he dropped her off, still in ecstasy over being with Jennifer, he sees a single flower in a void of black and white that’s a vibrant pink. And as the movie goes on, whenever a character feels or does or acts in a way that’s different than who they are, the world around them will go from black and white to color. If they felt or acted silly or excited, rageful, sensual or even content, the world around them would change. First it started with flowers or wallpaper and soon it goes to whole people. We later start to see noticeable reactions from those who are “pleasant” and still in black and white versus those who are, as they would term it “colored”. The Citizens Council of Pleasantville instituted new rules to keep things “pleasant” by banning colors of paint, closing down places where people would meet to enjoy themselves as well as other prohibitions. The movie eventually devolves to an allegory of the Jim Crow era of America and the nation’s embrace of the modern age with all the constructs of a diverse population, the good and the bad. We learn that sometimes humanity is not always the perfect vision of what was considered “pleasant”.

Three months ago, 25 year old Ahmaud Arbrey went for a jog in a neighborhood in Brusnwick, Georgia. After making a brief stop at a house that was under contrustion to took take a look around, verified by video evidence, the owners word and the fact that he was wearing jogging clothes in broad daylight, Arbrey was approached by three individuals. One in a single vehicles and the other two, father and son, Gregory and Travis McMichael. They were armed with firearms. Arbrey was not. After a confrontation with Arbrey, Travis McMichael exited his vehicle, approached Arbrey with his firearm in hand and as Arbrey resisted McMichael’s efforts to retrain and detain him for nothing he did wrong, he was shot and killed.

Two full months would pass by. And the only action that was taken in response to this shooting was to justify the actions of the murderers by saying that Arbrey was suspected in a burglery(he was not), in an area with a recent rash of burglaries(which there were none) and that he, an unarmed man, attacked three armed men, which was cause enough for them to shoot him to death, thereby blaming Arbrey for his own death. Nevermind the fact that if he were to flee, in their eyes he would be resisting, just same as if he were to attempt to wrestle away a firearm prepared to kill him would also be resisting in their eyes. Pretty much leaving Arbrey with no alternative other than to either be dead or be a criminal, neither of which should have been the case. For months after and likely for a multitude of years prior, the people of Brunswick, Georgia knew nothing and did even less. They were practically living in the same Pleasantville from the movie. And for that matter, given this case most of this country has been living in Pleasantville. Everything is wonderful. There are no societal ills. Any problems in a community are solved within 30 minutes. These same people who either have no awareness of the threat black men and women are under as we live our everyday lives or like to pretend that the world is still as pleasant as it was when it was in black and white. They will literally and willingly tell you that “they don’t see color.” Which is precisely what afflicted the people of Pleasantville. They didn’t just not see color. It is this process of thought that assumes things are pleasant by ignoring color, literally and figuratively. But in doing so, it shows a willingness to ignore an entire facet of our identity. That “color”, it’s a part of who we are. To ignore it, is to ignore us.  It is to have no awareness or grasp of entire truths and experiences living outside of a make-believe bubble. There’s a desire for their worlds to be devoid of such conflict and strife. They are content with the oblivion of a perfectly pleasant but absolutely unrealistic world.

In Pleasantville, things might be black and white in a literal sense, but with those that refuse to see the shade of America that exist whether they know it or not are living in a figurative black and white world. This country was built on the back of those with challenges to an idyllic order. Frankly, we wouldn’t have a country without them. It’s a part of the human experience. Our own humanity has challenged us to always seek to be a better country. Better than what we were before. But when you have those who desire to go back to a America that was defined by a place like Pleasantville, they desire to live in a America that no longer exist and quite frankly, never really did. Their America is as fictional as Pleasantville’s. They just didn’t know it. That’s the America Ahmaud Arbrey literally ran into. That’s the America some politicians promise to legislate us back to. An America that is devoid of color. An America that is not challenged by the humanity of others. An America that is pleasant again.

17 to the Power of 20

Joe Biden Rallies Union Members for Conor Lamb

20 Days Ago…

I’ve continued the Power Ranking of 20 Democratic Candidates for the 2020 Democratic Primary to be concluded on its 20th iteration the day of the 2020 Iowa Caucus.

Since the last list… Major candidates like Beto O’Rourke have exited the race… While other candidates like Deval Patrick have officially entered the race. Other candidates like Michael Bloomberg has made strong indications that he plans to enter… Pete Buttigeig have made strong pushes in polling in Iowa, tightening the distance between the top tier of candidates…

Reminder, this is a “power ranking” and not a list of my favorites in the order I’d like them. But taking in the news cycle over the last 20 days and other pertinent data, this ranking is just a snapshot of where I think the candidates are and where the voters are in their likelihood to select them as the Democratic Nominee for the 2020 Presidential Race.

So don’t be mad at me. Tell your candidate to get better.

So without further adieu…

20.  Nancy Pelosi – Speaker of the House, California– 47 (Last 20: #20)

19.  Joe Sestak – Former Congressman, Pennsylvania– 67 (Last 20: #17)

18.  John Delaney – Former Congressman, Maryland – 56 (Last 20: #16)

17.  Marianne Williamson– Entrepreneur/Author , California– 67 (Last 20: 15)

16.  Hillary Clinton – Former Secretary of State, New York – 72 (Last 20: #18)

15.  Deval Patrick – Former Governor, Massachusetts – 63(Last 20: Unranked)

14.  Michael Bennet – Senator, Colorado– 54 (Last 20: #14)

13.  Michael Bloomberg – Former Mayor, New York– 77 (Last 20: Unranked)

12.  Tulsi Gabbard – Congresswoman, Hawaii – 38 (Last 20: #11)

11.  Steve Bullock – Governor, Montana – 53 (Last 20: #13)

10.  Tom Steyer – Businessman, California – 62 (Last 20: #12)

9.   Julian Castro – Former HUD Secretary, Texas – 45 (Last 20: #10)

8.   Cory Booker – Senator, New Jersey – 50 (Last 20: #6)

7.   Andrew Yang – Entrepreneur, New York – 44 (Last 20: #9)

6.   Amy Klobuchar – Senator, Minnesota – 59 (Last 20: #8)

5.   Kamala Harris – Senator, California – 55 (Last 20: #5)

4.   Pete Buttigieg – Mayor, Indiana – 37 (Last 20: #4)

3.   Bernie Sanders – Senator, Vermont – 78 (Last 20: #3)

2.   Joe Biden – Former Vice President, Delaware – 76 (Last 20: #2)

1.   Elizabeth Warren – Senator, Massachusetts – 70 (Last 20: #1)

“Remember, Remember the Fifth of November!”

2019 Dems

“Remember, Remember the fifth of November, the Gunpowder Treason plot. I know of no reason why the Gunpowder Treason should ever be forgot.”

The quote delivered by the title character in Alan Moore’s “V For Vendetta” referencing the failed assassination attempt on King James I.  It was quite a different fifth of November last night in Virginia. The Democrats held 48 seats in the House of Delegates and 20 seats in the State Senate. By the end of the night Virginia Democrats had won 55 seats in the House of Delegates and 21 seats in the State Senate. With both houses of the General Assembly, both Junior and Senior Senators, the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General and six of the 11 members of Virginia’s Congressional delegation, the Democrats have gained control of all sectors of government in the Commonwealth of Virginia. And along the way, while Democrats have won across the state on all levels, they might have lost the perspective on what was actually won.

“Remember, Remember the third of November…”

In 2009, the night Democrats across Virginia lost races for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General and a net of six seats in the General Assembly. With majorities in the House and the Senate and with a seated governor, the Republicans were able to control the Redistricting of electoral district maps. And as a result, Democrats that held seats in the 2nd, 5th and the 9th Congressional Districts all lost the following year. House and Senate districts across the state were changed to secure the majority Republicans had won, making electoral challenges so unlikely that in just a few years Incumbents in both parties were for all intent and purposes politically invulnerable. But the stacking of the deck and packing of black voters that the Republicans did caused cracks, first in the 4th Congressional Districts and then others districts across the state. The checks we put on the Legislative Branch was balanced by the Judicial Branch. And now, in an inherently political process, the Democrats can now control Redistricting, which could only cause the Democratic majority won on the fifth of November to strengthen for years to come…

“Remember, Remember the the 25th of September…”

In 1921. The year after the the passage of the 19th Amendment, that gave women the right to vote, it was believed that that Amendment, was simply not enough to guarantee the equal rights of women. Just as the 14th Amendment was not believed to be enough to guarantee African Americans the right to vote, another Amendment was needed. Plans were announced to amend the U.S. Constitution to guarantee women the same right as men. However support for this amendment was fractured almost from the beginning. But by the 1960s, when Americans began to exercise their freedoms more, it was realized the growing support for the Equal Rights Amendment was now on the table. And nearly 50 years after it was initially proposed, the ERA was passed by an overwhelming majority in Congress. And as dictated by the Constitution, it was now left to three-fourths of the states to individually approve it for it to be ratified. Almost immediately, nearly half of the states in the union voted to ratify. By the deadline given by congress, the total was up to 35, still three states short to ratify. And where the National Organization of Women backed an initial resurgence, the #MeToo movemnt has undo given way to tacit approval to additional legislatures bringing the total number of that’s to have ratified the ERA to 37, one short of the three-fourths needed for it’s ratification. The Equal Rights Amendment can now be Ratified.

“Remember, Remember the 31st of May…”

This year. A disturbed city worker came to work at the Virginia Beach Municipal Center armed and with the intent to murder. Before the end of the day, before the beginning of a Memorial Day weekend, he shot 16 people in a shootout with the police that lasted over 30 minutes before being shot himself, representing the deadliest instance of gun violence in the state since 33 were killed on the campus of Virginia Tech in 2007.  Horrified by the continuation of these tragedies, the Governor called for a Special Session to address the epidemic of  all gun violence that is responsible for the death of hundreds of Virginians. The shooting at the Virginia Beach Municipal center, being the precipice for action, the Virginia General Assembly was to convene to consider several actions to universalizing background checks, penalizing straw purchases and notably reviving Virginia’s One Gun A Month law, which was initially passed in 1993 to address the “Iron Pipeline” of guns being trafficked up Interstate 95 to New York that allowed for Virginia to be they city’s number one provider for crime guns.  In the years after it was passed, Virginia dropped to eighth, but the law was repealed in 2012 and to no surprise, Virginia went back to being New York’s main supplier. These are challenges the Governor sought to address when the General Assembly convened at noon on July 9th. A hour and a half later, the Republican controlled House and Senate voted to adjourn until November without considering a single piece of legislation at all, despite promises to do so.

Well here we are.  November. And Virginia voters have voted to permanently adjourn those legislators. And in their place, Virginia now has the opportunity to pass meaningful legislation to address gun violence that as killed kids, women and everyday Virginians on a daily basis. Gun violence. Equal Rights for Women. Redistricting of our legislative districts to end partisan gerrymandering. It is now all well within our grasp.

Moore’s V challenged his readers to remember the 5th of November and to make it a day that shall never be forgotten. However in 2019, Virginia, we have given ourselves a new remembrance. Not for a plot to assassinate a monarch. But a tide to right wrongs, save lives and secure the rights of all Virginians. So, for this year alone, in this state, I propose a change to that quote and make it more fitting…

“Remember, Remember the fifth of November, the night the Democrats won all the top spots. I know of no reason why the 2019 Democratic Wave should ever be forgot.”

16 to the Power of 20

Hillary Bernie Tulsi

20 Days Ago…

I’ve continued the Power Ranking of 20 Democratic Candidates for the 2020 Democratic Primary to be concluded on its 20th iteration the day of the 2020 Iowa Caucus.

Since the last list… The Democrats held their 4th debate of the cycle… Bernie Sanders announced endorsements from Congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhlan Omar and Rashida Tliab… Congressman Tim Ryan dropped out of the race… Former Secretary of State and 2016 Nominee Hillary Clinton suggested  that Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard might be a Russian asset, which caused her to aim her campaign efforts at her…

Reminder, this is a “power ranking” and not a list of my favorites in the order I’d like them. But taking in the news cycle over the last 20 days and other pertinent data, this ranking is just a snapshot of where I think the candidates are and where the voters are in their likelihood to select them as the Democratic Nominee for the 2020 Presidential Race.

So don’t be mad at me. Tell your candidate to get better.

So without further adieu…

 

20.  Nancy Pelosi – Speaker of the House, California – 79 (Last 20: 20)

19.  Wayne Messam – Mayor, Florida – 45 (Last 20: #19)

18.  Hillary Clinton – Former Secretary of State, New York – 72 (Last 20: Unranked)

17.  Joe Sestak – Former Congressman, Pennsylvania– 67 (Last 20: #18)

16.  John Delaney – Former Congressman, Maryland – 56 (Last 20: #17)

15.  Marianne Williamson– Entrepreneur/Author , California– 67 (Last 20: 14)

14.  Michael Bennet – Senator, Colorado– 54 (Last 20: #15)

13.  Steve Bullock – Governor, Montana – 53 (Last 20: #13)

12.  Tom Steyer – Businessman, California – 62 (Last 20: #11)

11.  Tulsi Gabbard – Congresswoman, Hawaii – 38 (Last 20: #12)

10.  Julian Castro – Former HUD Secretary, Texas – 45 (Last 20: #10)

9.   Andrew Yang – Entrepreneur, New York – 44 (Last 20: #9)

8.   Amy Klobuchar – Senator, Minnesota – 59 (Last 20: #8)

7.   Beto O’Rourke – Former Congressman, Texas – 47 (Last 20: #7)

6.   Cory Booker – Senator, New Jersey – 50 (Last 20: #6)

5.   Kamala Harris – Senator, California – 55 (Last 20: #4)

4.   Pete Buttigieg – Mayor, Indiana – 37 (Last 20: #5)

3.   Bernie Sanders – Senator, Vermont – 78 (Last 20: #3)

2.   Joe Biden – Former Vice President, Delaware – 76 (Last 20: #2)

1.   Elizabeth Warren – Senator, Massachusetts – 70 (Last 20: #1)

15 to the Power of 20

Ryan Buttigieg Bennet

20 Days Ago…

I’ve continued the Power Ranking of 20 Democratic Candidates for the 2020 Democratic Primary to be concluded on its 20th iteration the day of the 2020 Iowa Caucus.

Since the last list… Bill De Blasio has withdrawn his candidacy, bringing the total of declared and running candidates to 19… Elizabeth Warren’s polling and fundraising number has pushed her solidly ahead in the primary and is now considered a front-runner by many… Bernie Sanders had to suspend campaigning due to what was later revealed to be a heart attack… Two additionally candidates, Tulsi Gabbard and Tom Steyer, have qualified for the October 15th Debate… the President asked the Presidents of China and Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, causing Democrats to launch an Impeachment Inquiry, which has implications for the President and Vice President.

Reminder, this is a “power ranking” and not a list of my favorites in the order I’d like them. But taking in the news cycle over the last 20 days and other pertinent data, this ranking is just a snapshot of where I think the candidates are and where the voters are in their likelihood to select them as the Democratic Nominee for the 2020 Presidential Race.

So don’t be mad at me. Tell your candidate to get better.

So without further adieu…

20.  Nancy Pelosi – Speaker of the House, California – 79 (Last 20: Unranked)

19.  Wayne Messam – Mayor, Florida – 45 (Last 20: #20)

18.  Joe Sestak – Former Congressman, Pennsylvania– 67 (Last 20: #19)

17.  John Delaney – Former Congressman, Maryland – 56 (Last 20: #18)

16.  Tim Ryan – Congressman, Ohio – 46 (Last 20: #15)

15.  Michael Bennet – Senator, Colorado– 54 (Last 20: #14)

14.  Marianne Williamson– Entrepreneur/Author , California– 67 (Last 20: 16)

13.  Steve Bullock – Governor, Montana – 53 (Last 20: #13)

12.  Tulsi Gabbard – Congresswoman, Hawaii – 38 (Last 20: #12)

11.  Tom Steyer – Businessman, California – 62 (Last 20: #11)

10.  Julian Castro – Former HUD Secretary, Texas – 45 (Last 20: #9)

9.   Andrew Yang – Entrepreneur, New York – 44 (Last 20: #8)

8.   Amy Klobuchar – Senator, Minnesota – 59 (Last 20: #10)

7.   Beto O’Rourke – Former Congressman, Texas – 47 (Last 20: #7)

6.   Cory Booker – Senator, New Jersey – 50 (Last 20: #6)

5.   Pete Buttigieg – Mayor, Indiana – 37 (Last 20: #5)

4.   Kamala Harris – Senator, California – 54 (Last 20: #4)

3.   Bernie Sanders – Senator, Vermont – 78 (Last 20: #3)

2.   Joe Biden – Former Vice President, Delaware – 76 (Last 20: #1)

1.   Elizabeth Warren – Senator, Massachusetts – 70 (Last 20: #2)

 

14 to the Power of 20

deblasio sestak sanders

20 Days Ago…

I’ve continued the Power Ranking of the 20 Democratic Candidates for the 2020 Democratic Primary to be concluded on its 20th iteration the day of the 2020 Iowa Caucus.

Since the last list… Another candidate has withdrawn, Kirsten Gillibrand… The ten candidates that qualified had their 3rd debate of the 2020 cycle. It was notable by the rather solid performances from most candidates, with the exception of Julian Castro, who received negative criticism for a comment about Vice President Biden’s memory…

Reminder, this is a “power ranking” and not a list of my favorites in the order I’d like them. But taking in the news cycle over the last 20 days and other pertinent data, this ranking is just a snapshot of where I think the candidates are and where the voters are in their likelihood to select them as the Democratic Nominee for the 2020 Presidential Race.

So don’t be mad at me. Tell your candidate to get better.

So without further adieu…

20.  Wayne Messam – Mayor, Florida – 45 (Last 20: Unranked)

19.  Joe Sestak – Former Congressman, Pennsylvania– 67 (Last 20: #20)

18.  John Delaney – Former Congressman, Maryland – 56 (Last 20: #19)

17.  Bill De Blasio – Mayor, New York – 58 (Last 20: #18)

16.  Marianne Williamson– Entrepreneur/Author , California– 67 (Last 20: 17)

15.  Tim Ryan – Congressman, Ohio – 46 (Last 20: #15)

14.  Michael Bennet – Senator, Colorado– 54 (Last 20: #16)

13.  Steve Bullock – Governor, Montana – 53 (Last 20: #14)

12.  Tulsi Gabbard – Congresswoman, Hawaii – 38 (Last 20: #13)

11.  Tom Steyer – Businessman, California – 62 (Last 20: #12)

10.  Amy Klobuchar – Senator, Minnesota – 59 (Last 20: #10)

9.   Julian Castro – Former HUD Secretary, Texas – 45 (Last 20: #8)

8.   Andrew Yang – Entrepreneur, New York – 44 (Last 20: #7)

7.   Beto O’Rourke – Former Congressman, Texas – 46 (Last 20: #9)

6.   Cory Booker – Senator, New Jersey – 50 (Last 20: #6)

5.   Pete Buttigieg – Mayor, Indiana – 37 (Last 20: #5)

4.   Kamala Harris – Senator, California – 54 (Last 20: #4)

3.   Bernie Sanders – Senator, Vermont – 78 (Last 20: #3)

2.   Elizabeth Warren – Senator, Massachusetts – 70 (Last 20: #2)

1.   Joe Biden – Former Vice President, Delaware – 76 (Last 20: #1)

13 to the Power of 20

steyer delaney klobuchar

20 Days Ago…

I’ve continued the Power Ranking of the 20 Democratic Candidates for the 2020 Democratic Primary to be concluded on its 20th iteration the day of the 2020 Iowa Caucus.

Since the last list… Three additional candidates, John Hickenlooper, Jay Inslee and Seth Moulton, have withdrawn from the race… A tenth and likely final candidate, Amy Klobuchar, has qualified for the third Democratic Debate in two weeks… A surprising poll has come out recently with a surging Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders in a statistical dead heat with the front runner, Joe Biden…

Reminder, this is a “power ranking” and not a list of my favorites in the order I’d like them. But taking in the news cycle over the last 20 days and other pertinent data, this ranking is just a snapshot of where I think the candidates are and where the voters are in their likelihood to select them as the Democratic Nominee for the 2020 Presidential Race.

So don’t be mad at me. Tell your candidate to get better.

So without further adieu…

20.  Joe Sestak – Former Congressman, Pennsylvania– 67 (Last 20: Unranked)

19.  John Delaney – Former Congressman, Maryland – 56 (Last 20: Unranked)

18.  Bill De Blasio – Mayor, New York – 58 (Last 20: #17)

17.  Marianne Williamson– Entrepreneur/Author , California– 66 (Last 20: 16)

16.  Michael Bennet – Senator, Colorado– 54 (Last 20: #20)

15.  Tim Ryan – Congressman, Ohio – 45 (Last 20: #15)

14.  Steve Bullock – Governor, Montana – 53 (Last 20: #14)

13.  Tulsi Gabbard – Congresswoman, Hawaii – 38 (Last 20: #12)

12.  Tom Steyer – Businessman, California – 62 (Last 20: #19)

11.  Kirsten Gillibrand – Senator, New York – 52 (Last 20: #10)

10.  Amy Klobuchar – Senator Minnesota – 58 (Last 20: #11)

9.   Beto O’Rourke – Former Congressman, Texas – 46 (Last 20: #9)

8.   Julian Castro – Former HUD Secretary, Texas – 44 (Last 20: #8)

7.   Andrew Yang – Entrepreneur, New York – 44 (Last 20: #7)

6.   Cory Booker – Senator, New Jersey – 50 (Last 20: #6)

5.   Pete Buttigieg – Mayor, Indiana – 37 (Last 20: #5)

4.   Kamala Harris – Senator, California – 54 (Last 20: #3)

3.   Bernie Sanders – Senator, Vermont – 77 (Last 20: #4)

2.   Elizabeth Warren – Senator, Massachusetts – 69 (Last 20: #2)

1.   Joe Biden – Former Vice President, Delaware – 76 (Last 20: #1)